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Log Files in Raspberry PI TARPN Node

Logs exist to record issues, events, history. Most of the logs are in plain text.

Some of the log files you'll find are written to and read from applications and are not meant for humans. The log files listed here below are all readable by you and may be interesting. It is common for a developer or operator to watch the logs using a command tail which, among other powers, grabs the last bunch of lines of a file and puts them to the screen. tail -f logname.log can also give you a live scrolling display as the log is changed. Use man tail to find out more about the tail command. While you are at it, check out these Linux commands:

Here I describe some of the logs most useful to TARPN node operators.

Logs in /var/log

These logs are located in a standard Linux place for logs which is /var/log
ls -lrats | tail -13
     0 -rw-r--r--  1 root root         0 Jan 13 17:57 tarpn_home_webapp_copylog.log
   336 -rw-r--r--  1 root root    338229 Jan 13 23:11 tarpn.log
   400 -rw-r--r--  1 root root    402488 Jan 13 23:12 tarpn_home.log
    48 -rw-r--r--  1 root root     44095 Jan 13 23:12 statusmonitor.log
  1396 -rw-r--r--  1 root root   1419781 Jan 13 23:27 TARPN_Home_Chat.log
  3772 -rw-r--r--  1 root root   3847376 Jan 13 23:32 TARPN_Home_Chat_Raw.log
  2160 -rw-r--r--  1 root root   2204642 Jan 13 23:37 TARPN_Home_Node.log
   156 -rw-r-----  1 root adm     152611 Jan 13 23:41 auth.log
 14992 -rw-r--r--  1 root root  15303902 Jan 13 23:41 tarpn_pwrman.log
   180 -rw-r-----  1 root adm     178675 Jan 13 23:45 debug
   196 -rw-r--r--  1 root root    193961 Jan 13 23:45 tarpn_linkstatus.log
118036 -rw-r-----  1 root adm  120864356 Jan 13 23:45 syslog
118036 -rw-r-----  1 root adm  120862257 Jan 13 23:45 daemon.log

auth.log

This log shows instances where somebody assumed root-level access to Linux and the filesystem. This happens during calls by TARPN scripts and can also happen if a user does the sudo Linux command.

daemon.log

I don't have a proper definition of this log but what I know is that if a background application does a print to STDOUT, that print shows here. So, if you have an application, like bbs-checker or tarpn-home, and it prints something, it'll show up in this log.

debug

I need input from the Linux experts out there. What's the difference between this and daemon.log?

statusmonitor.log

There is a background service for TARPN which checks to see if the neighbor links are up and running. It also checks the BBS to see if there is any mail for the operator. This log tracks the execution of that background service. The status monitor service has other outputs including the tarpn_linkstatus.log (see below) and two status files saved in /usr/local/etc called bbsunreadmessagescount.txt and bbshasmail.txt. You'll need to use
grep MAIL /usr/local/etc/bbshasmail.txt to read the one and
od -H /usr/local/etc/bbsunreadmessagecount.txt to read the other.

syslog

I need input from the Linux experts out there. What's the difference between this and daemon.log?

tarpn.log

This is written to by the background service and the scripts which start and stop the node, usually on demand from the user.

tarpn_home.log

This log is written to by the background service which calls TARPN-HOME's python program.

tarpn_home_webapp_copylog.log

This gets the output of the TARPN-HOME python app. Usually there are about 4 lines of text printed between when the app starts, after the node comes up, and when the app quits, if the node ever goes down. This is a good place to look for debugging though if something is going wrong with TARPN-HOME.

TARPN_Home_Chat.log

This file is actually used by TARPN-HOME to refresh the Chat Traffic browser window if you connect a new browser or refresh your current tab. This file is in HTML Tags.

TARPN_Home_Chat_Raw.log

This records the text TARPN-HOME displays in the Chat Traffic window. If you want to remember what happened in a particular conversation you were on last week, this is a good place to look. Or, if a really long conversation happened while you were at the pub, you can read about it here.

TARPN_Home_Node.log

This file keeps a copy of all of the text played out by TARPN-HOME into the Node pane.

tarpn_pwrman.log

There is a background service which will optionally support hardware shutdown requests. This log contains it's comments about the hardware operation. If you are working to hook up Raspberry PI shutdown control, or status lights, you may want to check this log.

tarpn_linkstatus.log

This log is written to about every 15 minutes to record what ports on the node are currently live to the neighbors. This is a good place to look if you think one of your neighbor links was off-line recently. The process which writes this log can also play out a WAV file (throught he Raspberry PI speaker output) every 15 minutes if one of your neighbor links is off-line. Just make put a wav file called badlinksound.wav and put it in the /home/pi directory. You can use this command to turn on the alert noise using one of the existing wave sounds on the Raspberry PI:
cp ~/ringfolder/danger_danger.wav ~/badlinksound.wav

tarpn_tarpnstat.log

rx_tarpnstatapp runs continuously in the background, sleeping for 1 second, then checking every port on the node for incoming TARPNstat messages from the neighbors. After doing its business in each 1-second period, it checks to see if 15 minutes has passed since its last tarpn_tarpnstat.log entry. If it has been 15 minutes, the program writes a new tarpn_tarpnstat.log line including the time of day in years-months-day hours-minutes-seconds, and stating the unix epoch time, and the number of TARPNstat messages heard across all of the ports in the past 15 minutes.
2019-03-23 05:54:02 -- listening @ 1553334837 -- reported 1 since last timestamp
2019-03-23 06:09:03 -- listening @ 1553335738 -- reported 7 since last timestamp
2019-03-23 06:24:04 -- listening @ 1553336639 -- reported 5 since last timestamp

Logs in ~/bpq/logs

These logs are in a subdirectory of the pi users folder. Full path is: /home/pi/bpq/logs
ls -lrats | tail -10
  732 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi   745006 Jan 13 18:59 log_190113_BBS.txt
  796 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi   809338 Jan 14 18:59 log_190114_BBS.txt
  472 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi   478486 Jan 14 18:59 log_190114_CHAT.txt
  364 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi   365376 Jan 15 18:59 log_190115_CHAT.txt
  848 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi   864027 Jan 15 18:59 log_190115_BBS.txt
  808 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi   822362 Jan 16 18:58 log_190116_BBS.txt
  364 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi   364565 Jan 16 18:59 log_190116_CHAT.txt
  488 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi   495241 Jan 17 09:27 log_190117_BBS.txt
36184 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 36991247 Jan 17 09:27 BPQTelnetServer.log
  212 -rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi   212118 Jan 17 09:27 log_190117_CHAT.txt

log_<DATE>_CHAT.txt

This log file is created new every day. The previous day's log file is left in the folder. Eventually there will be one log per day going back to the last time the /bpq folder was destroyed by an install. Mbr/> This log contains traffic coming into your CROWD node both from the local operator and from the neighbor CHAT nodes. The more neighbors you have, the more copies of the output traffic you will see. Symbols in the direction column include: In the log fragment shown below, K4GRU node is offline temporarily. You can see the TADD node CHAT service trying to connect to K4GRU's CHAT service, because TADD node is configured to have ZGRU09:K4GRU-9 as a neighbor. The connection fails because K4GRU-9 is not on TADD's node-list.
190117 14:29:47 |          Connecting to Chat Node ZGRU09
190117 14:29:47 >          c K4GRU-9
190117 14:29:47 <          TADD:KA2DEW-2} Downlink connect needs port number - C P CALLSIGN
190117 14:29:47 |          Chat Node K4GRU-9 Disconnected
190117 14:29:55 <          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV Mark - I will be busy for today if I get the base boxes
190117 14:29:55 >          N3LTV  : Mark - I will be busy for today if I get the base boxes
190117 14:29:55 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV Mark - I will be busy for today if I get the base boxes
190117 14:29:55 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV Mark - I will be busy for today if I get the base boxes
190117 14:29:55 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV Mark - I will be busy for today if I get the base boxes
190117 14:30:18 <          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I can work on the radio boxes next week
190117 14:30:18 >          N3LTV  : I can work on the radio boxes next week
190117 14:30:18 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I can work on the radio boxes next week
190117 14:30:18 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I can work on the radio boxes next week
190117 14:30:18 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I can work on the radio boxes next week
190117 14:30:20 >          KKA2DEW-5 N3LTV-9 6.0.14.12
190117 14:30:20 >          KKA2DEW-5 KN4ORB-9 6.0.14.12
190117 14:30:20 >          KKA2DEW-5 AI4WV-9 6.0.14.12
190117 14:30:20 >          KKA2DEW-5 NC4FG-9 6.0.14.12
190117 14:30:23 <          KKN4ORB-9 KA2DEW-5 6.0.14.12
190117 14:30:54 <          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I'd say - ditch the routing of the 1/4" and we just sand the edges
190117 14:30:54 >          N3LTV  : I'd say - ditch the routing of the 1/4" and we just sand the edges
190117 14:30:54 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I'd say - ditch the routing of the 1/4" and we just sand the edges
190117 14:30:54 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I'd say - ditch the routing of the 1/4" and we just sand the edges
190117 14:30:54 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I'd say - ditch the routing of the 1/4" and we just sand the edges
190117 14:31:31 <          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I did 3 base boxes on the last batch from Tadd
190117 14:31:31 >          N3LTV  : I did 3 base boxes on the last batch from Tadd
190117 14:31:31 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I did 3 base boxes on the last batch from Tadd
190117 14:31:31 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I did 3 base boxes on the last batch from Tadd
190117 14:31:31 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV I did 3 base boxes on the last batch from Tadd
190117 14:32:07 <          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV back later
190117 14:32:07 >          N3LTV  : back later
190117 14:32:07 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV back later
190117 14:32:07 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV back later
190117 14:32:07 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV back later
190117 14:32:09 <          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV away
190117 14:32:09 >          N3LTV  : away
190117 14:32:09 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV away
190117 14:32:09 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV away
190117 14:32:09 >          DN3LTV-9 N3LTV away
190117 14:32:10 |          Connecting to Chat Node ZGRU09
190117 14:32:10 >          c K4GRU-9
190117 14:32:10 <          TADD:KA2DEW-2} Downlink connect needs port number - C P CALLSIGN
190117 14:32:10 |          Chat Node K4GRU-9 Disconnected
190117 14:32:37 <          DKM4JRH-9 KM4JRH OK, I'll be on my way shortly.
190117 14:32:37 >          KM4JRH : OK, I'll be on my way shortly.
190117 14:32:37 >          DKM4JRH-9 KM4JRH OK, I'll be on my way shortly.
190117 14:32:37 >          DKM4JRH-9 KM4JRH OK, I'll be on my way shortly.
190117 14:32:37 >          DKM4JRH-9 KM4JRH OK, I'll be on my way shortly.

log_<DATE>_BBS.txt

This log shows connections, commands, and results done to the BBS service at your node.

BPQTelnetServer.log

This log shows whenever anybody uses Telnet to connect to the G8BPQ node. As of early 2019, the only open Telnet connection is presented with the local-operator's callsign and requests password p. This is called for by the Linux command tarpn tx and also by TARPN programs checking BBS status. Here is a segment of that log for the TADD node.
17/01/2019 10:03:49 6 Disconnected. Bytes Sent = 914 Bytes Received 4
17/01/2019 10:04:20 6 127.0.0.1 User=
17/01/2019 10:04:21 6 127.0.0.1 User=ka2dew
17/01/2019 10:04:22 6 127.0.0.1 Password=p
17/01/2019 10:04:22 6 127.0.0.1 Call Accepted Callsign=KA2DEW
17/01/2019 10:04:25 6 Disconnected. Bytes Sent = 914 Bytes Received 4
17/01/2019 10:04:56 6 127.0.0.1 User=
17/01/2019 10:04:57 6 127.0.0.1 User=ka2dew
17/01/2019 10:04:58 6 127.0.0.1 Password=p
17/01/2019 10:04:58 6 127.0.0.1 Call Accepted Callsign=KA2DEW
17/01/2019 10:05:01 6 Disconnected. Bytes Sent = 914 Bytes Received 4
17/01/2019 10:05:32 6 127.0.0.1 User=
17/01/2019 10:05:33 6 127.0.0.1 User=ka2dew
Note that the BBS is periodically connected to by the bbs_checker application and the TARPN-HOME application. bbs_checker uses the local-operator's callsign. TARPN-HOME uses the node's callsign.
© Tadd Torborg, 2019 -- all rights reserved